Monthly Archives For June 2014

Housing Action Ireland Manifesto Launch: 12th of June, @6pm, Teachers’ Club Parnell Sq

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Housing Action Ireland

Housing Action Ireland has been working away quietly for some time, but on the 12th of June we’re launching our Housing Manifesto. This is a public event so we hope to see as many of you there as possible. The manifesto will be available one week before the launch – watch this space to get a copy. Full details below and more to follow.

Housing Action Now

in The Teachers Club Parnell Square

On Thursday June 12th 2014 at 6pm.

Screening of the 15 minute film Scattered by Joe Lee

and O’Devaney Gardens Residents and Workers.

Aidan O’Halloran and Raymond Hegarty will play some music.

A short version of the Housing Manifesto for online sharing is available here. The full version is available here.

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Economics and the Debate on Immigration II

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This article was originally posted on Socialist Economic Bulletin on the 6th of June.

The now notorious UKIP poster which suggested the entire population of the EU might come to Britain for work is designed to whip up racism. But it contains two fallacies that are unfortunately shared by many people who are not racists, and are therefore worth rebutting.

Myth 1
The first myth is that Britain is a uniquely attractive place within Europe in terms of pay or workers’ rights, or social security entitlements. The graphic below was produced by the UNITE union in Ireland in their argument for higher pay. But it is such a good graphic it is worth reproducing as it stands.

Graphic 1. Private Sector Hourly Compensation in Western Europe, € PPPs

Graphic 1. Private Sector Hourly Compensation in Western Europe, € PPPs

Compensation includes both pay and social wages such as pensions and other benefits. The data is in Purchasing Power Parity terms, so that they account for price differentials between European countries. The data is drawn from Eurostat database here.

The compensation for British workers is among the lowest in Western Europe. Britain is not a uniquely attractive destination for economic migration within the EU. Therefore it should come as no surprise that Britain has one of the lower levels of immigration of the Western European economies.

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Basic Income – An Idea Worth Exploring

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Basic Income is being discussed more and more.  It will be discussed at this weekend’s Basic Income Ireland seminar.  Basic Income is a weekly payment from the state to every resident without any means test or work requirement – a payment sufficient to afford a decent living standard.  It would work like this:  I receive a weekly payment from the state of approximately €200 per week (if that’s considered to afford me a decent living standard) whether I work or not.  Any income I earn above that is taxed.  If I choose not to work I still receive the €200 weekly payment.   In essence, BI breaks the link between work and income.

There have been considerable criticisms.

First, it has been dismissed on grounds of cost.  It certainly would be expensive, requiring very high tax rates on income from work.  Tax rates of 40 to 50 percent on all income have been proposed to pay for the programme.  And given the need to fund public services, additional social protection payments and investment it is hard to see how this could be introduced in the short-term.

Second is the impact on the labour market and work behaviour.  In short, if you give everyone an adequate income would they choose not to work?  This could create labour shortages in key sectors which would hamper growth and undermine the ability to fund BI.

Third is the inflationary impact.  Boosting incomes could put pressure on prices and drive up imports which in turn would require increasing the BI as it struggled to maintain value.  This could result in an inflationary spiral (of course, we could do with a little spiral to get us out of this deflation).

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Sewage Babies

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Put on our Sunday best for Mass.

Let on we haven’t heard

about dead babies in Tuam.

Eight hundred infants,

bunkered in human filth.

Bones tossed like old coins,

dump of dead currency.

white

To those who defend

servants of God and state:

‘They did the best

with what they had.’

What have we?

White

Garrison church.

Proud, complicit government.

Blessed well of

indifference.

White

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Same Same but Different

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Book Review: Event, Slavoj Žižek; The Most Sublime Hysteric, Slavoj Žižek and Hegel and the Art of NegationAndrew W. Hass 

Event, Slavoj Žižek (Penguin, 2014)

A difficulty in reading Žižek is that he often seems to be juggling with too many balls, making dizzy the reader who tries to track the course of a single idea as it speedily travels from one page to the next before somersaulting in a paragraph. The challenge is not in grasping the idea but in following it amidst the inflections and involuting digressions. The whole asymptotic shebang can become just too much and the exasperated reader is tempted to close shop on the whole act by slamming the book shut.

What makes Event easier to read and follow through from start to finish is that this time one of the balls is bigger and more brightly coloured than all the others. The reader can keep this master ball in focus, safe in the knowledge that the smaller ones circulating with it are all derivatives, examples or reduplications of the one defining conceit: Event.

Ordinarily an event is just something that happens but with an Event something is realized in a way that is extraordinary. Rust Cohle in True Detective is far from being an ordinary police officer because of how he actualizes and fully realizes, in a Platonic way, the Idea of the detective.  For Plato, everyday empirical reality is a pale shadow of the bright and substantial reality of Ideas, an originary and eternal order not to be confused with the fleeting world of appearances. DunmanusBay that I see outside a window, and every other bay that anyone ever sees, only participates in the Idea of Bay by virtue of being a surface copy. Žižek gives Platonism a twist by saying, yes, there are absolute Ideas but they realize themselves purely in appearance. Rust Cohle, in the pursuit of his investigation embodies what it authentically means to be a detective, he enacts the truth that belongs to the concept of detective and in him the Idea of detective shines in all its purity. The essence that he embodies is there, unhidden in the material reality of his behaviour. In Hegelese, the distinction between appearance and essence is inscribed within appearance – because appearance is all there is.

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June Issue of Socialist Voice Out Now!

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June issue of Socialist Voice is out now   It can also be view/downloaded at

http://www.communistpartyofireland.ie/sv/index.html

Contents

  1.     A changed, and changing, political landscape [EMC]
  2.     The re-emergence of dark forces [TMK]
  3.     EU election shows up core-periphery divide [NL]
  4.     Government proposals on the “right to bargain” [NC]
  5.     The class war intensifies [TMS]
  6.     Spain moves to the left [TMS]
  7.     Solidarity with the Communist Party of Ukraine
  8.     Welcome to the new Ireland [NOM]
  9.     The compliant state [NOM]
  10.     Léirmheas: Tomhas maith ar Bono [CDF]
  11.     Films: Humanity and humour [JF]
  12.     Poems from Strabane
  13.     Frontier Soil


1.   A changed, and changing, political landscape

The election results have produced a changed and changing political landscape. There was a solid rejection of “austerity” by hundreds of thousands of working people throughout the country, with both Fine Gael and the Labour Party suffering heavy losses. The Labour Party has paid the heaviest price for its opportunism and its active support for anti-worker policies.

2. The re-emergence of dark forces

In Ireland we are often so wrapped up with our own election dramas that developments abroad may be overlooked and their impact on us missed. The remarkable rise of Sinn Féin, coupled with the equally spectacular plunge of the Labour Party and its leader, has predictably mesmerised the Dublin media. North of the border, where the story from the ballot boxes has offered little change, attention focused on the titillating travails of the recently formed and already collapsing NI21 party.

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IMF’d & EU too?

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This Reuters report suggests that Angela Merkel is trying to get the IMF’s Christine Lagarde installed as President of the EU Commission. Time to dust off this photo which is proving to be a little prescient.

“German Chancellor Angela Merkel has asked France whether it would be willing to put forward International Monetary Fund chief Christine Lagarde as president of the European Commission, two French sources briefed on the exchanges said.

German and IMF officials said Merkel had a private meeting with Lagarde during a visit to Washington in early May. They saw each other again in Berlin two weeks later when Lagarde attended a meeting of the heads of major international economic organizations hosted by the German government.

British Prime Minister David Cameron has led opposition to Juncker’s bid to succeed former Portuguese Prime Minister Jose Manuel Barroso, arguing that the EU needed new leadership committed to reform in response to voters’ dissatisfaction. London sees Juncker as an old-style European federalist.

British officials have made clear that Lagarde would be an acceptable alternative, as would center-left Danish Prime Minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt. Some British newspapers have campaigned for Lagarde to be given the role.”

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Dude, Where’s My Anglo-Irish Promissory Note Dividend?

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Remember back to the renegotiation of the debt repayments on the Anglo-Irish promissory note last year?  Amidst the sound of champagne corks popping we were told we would get a budgetary dividend of approximately €1 billion.  Overnight, our deficit was projected to fall from an estimated 3 percent in 2015 to 2.2 percent.  Less tax increases, less spending cuts.  Of course, we had to be quiet about all this – for fear of frightening the monetary-financing horses over at the ECB.  But what it meant was less fiscal pain.

So what happened to the dividend?  In short, it’s disappeared.   Under the latest Government projections, the deficit has quietly but firmly gone back up again.

ProDef

After the deal, the deficit in 2015 was projected to fall to €3,955 million (prior to the deal it was projected to be €5,325).  However, in the Government’s latest Stability Programme Update, the deficit has increased – back up to €5,235.  In percentage terms, the projected deficit yo-yoed – falling from to 2.9 percent of GDP to 2.2 percent after the deal, only to bounce back up to 2.9 percent.

So, instead of facing into a budget that needs to find €2 billion in fiscal adjustments, we should have only needed an €800 million adjustment.  And when you factor in the ESRI’s claim that, apart from water charges revenue, we wouldn’t need any more fiscal adjustments, then we should be facing into a budget where the Government could run expansionary policies (increase spending, cut taxes) and still meet the EU budgetary targets.

So what went wrong?

Three things happened.

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