Posts By Irish Left Review

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A New Kind of Trade Unionism Emerging

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This article was originally posted on the Trade Union Left Forum on the 14th of October.

A new kind of trade unionism is emerging and consolidating itself within the right2water campaign, led by Mandate and Unite and supported by OPATSI, the CPSU, and the CWU. These unions are bringing the broader social and economic interests of their members to the fore and committing resources, time and effort to support mobilisation not only of members, but also the working class and communities more generally.

By viewing their members as workers (as opposed to people paying a subscription for work-place representation services) these unions are placing the workers’ immediate social demands alongside, and equal to, their immediate work-place concerns. This is crucial if the trade union movement is to really represent its members and to recover its power and leverage in society. Wage increases alone will not improve the lot of workers while the political economy of the country is being restructured from one made up of citizens to one of customers in a toll-booth economic and political structure.

The TULF on many occasions has suggested that the trade union movement has a unique position in Ireland in having the resources and channels of communication to support the mobilisation of working people in a way that no left party can. And now it seems that some unions are realising this potential, which is both necessary and welcome.

The right2water alliance is a genuine alliance of union, political and community groups, making a clear demand and statement, “calling for the Government to recognise and legislate for access to water as a human right. We are demanding the Government abolish the planned introduction of water charges.”

As well as the five unions mentioned, community groups and parties have signed up to the campaign. Some 40,000 people have signed a petition calling for the scrapping of the water charges, close to 100,000 marched at the demonstration on 11 October, and more local actions are planned for 1 November.

The right2water campaign is not dictating tactics to communities or individuals but is building and growing a broad campaign of groups and people based on the principle of water as a human right and as a publicly owned utility and resource. Some on the left have attacked the campaign for not demanding non-payment; but at this moment building the biggest, broadest alliance against water charges and privatisation is the priority. A turn towards direct non-payment may be necessary in the future, but right now the campaign’s strength is in growing and building the alliance rather than splintering over tactical matters.

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Open Letter on the Housing Crisis

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An Open Letter to the Dublin City Council, Real Estate Agencies in Dublin, the USI, the PRTB, the HEA, Department of Education and skills, the NAMA, Landlords, the Citizens and Students of Dublin City on the Housing Crisis in Dublin.

As well as being sent to all of the above today it was also published on www.increature.com issue 4 on Sunday the 12th October

Dear all,

We are two final year university students who live in Dublin and wish to express our profound discontent with some of the situations we found ourselves in during the housing crisis that took place this summer in the Irish Capital and the clear discrimination against students which is common practice in the rental market.

Between June and September, we were actively looking for private accommodation in Dublin. We sent several hundreds of emails, made hundreds of phone calls, many of which were from abroad, went to numerous viewings and spent a lot of time, money and energy looking for a place. This house hunt was long, stressful and, overall, a very unpleasant experience which resulted in us sacrificing a large part of our summer, spare time after work, family time and the possibility to advance with college work (readings, dissertation, etc).

We finally found a place two weeks before the start of the academic year. A place that we are not entirely satisfied with, but had to take because we had no other decent offers. We are somewhat relieved that we were lucky enough to have found something, as we are very aware of the fact that many students were not as lucky and are therefore forced to commute, live in hostels or even have to take a year out of college.

One of us is a final year Student in the faculty of arts and humanities who worked the whole summer in a well-respected office in Dublin and will continue to work part-time throughout the academic year. The other is a final year Political Science and Geography student who works during the summer months and is financially supported by her father who works in one of the European Institutions in Brussels. Both of us have letters of references from all our previous landlords stating we are responsible tenants, that the rent and all utility bills have always been paid on time and that we left our previous flats in good condition. Furthermore, we both have good work references from well-respect institutions.

Having such documents, one must wonder how it took us three months to find a mediocre residence.

To us, the answer is very simple. The housing crisis meant that it was hard for everyone to find a place in Dublin due to the fact that this year there was a 43% drop in supply in the rental market and a 7.5% increase in rental prices, but in particular students have a clear disadvantage and are discriminated against.

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Right2Water March: Sat 11th of Oct, Garden of Remembrance @2pm

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The Right2Water campaign established by a number of trade unions and supported by campaign groups and left political parties will be holding a demonstration against the introduction of water charges at the Garden of Remembrance in Dublin at 2PM on Saturday, 11th October.

Everyone is being encouraged to wear or bring something blue. It is hope to form a huge blue water drop filling the streets with blue from O’Connell Bridge up D’Olier St around into Westmoreland St back to O’Connell Bridge.

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Apple Deal is ‘Tip of Tax-Dodging Iceberg’

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Press Release from Attac Ireland

Ireland’s deal with Apple, branded ‘illegal’ in a preliminary judgment by the European Commission, is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to tax-dodging by corporations here – with full cooperation from the State.

So says Attac Ireland, the Irish branch of the global activist group that campaigns for financial justice, including shutting down tax havens and taxing transactions.

Findings from the European Commission suggest that the State cut a special tax deal with Apple in return for job creation in Ireland by the multinational corporation.

“While the jobs created are relatively few, the loss in revenue to the Irish state is enormous,” Marie Moran of Attac Ireland said.

Globally Apple has $54.4 billion in offshore profits that have been barely taxed at all, thanks in part to a complex arrangement of Irish subsidiaries, known as the ‘Double-Irish’.

“Under Irish law, if the Irish subsidiary is controlled by managers who meet outside of Ireland, then it is treated for tax purposes as if it is a non-Irish company,” Conor McCabe of Attac Ireland explained.

“Companies such as Apple and Google, as well as pharmaceuticals, assign patent rights to these subsidiaries, which then charge the main Irish company a royalty fee for using these patents.” McCabe continued. “Under Irish tax law, royalty payments are tax-deductible. In effect, these companies charge themselves for using their own products, and then use that charge as a tax write-off. This is the Double-Irish.”

Marie Moran noted that while international attention is fixed on the case of Apple, the practice “has implications for a very large number of corporations based in Ireland for tax purposes. In fact, according to the Revenue Commissioner’s own reporting, the majority of companies based in Ireland pay corporation tax far below the headline rate of 12.5%, with some corporations paying no tax at all.”

“This arrangement is a form of corporate welfare that is not only potentially illegal but deeply anti-social,” Harry Browne of Attac Ireland added. “At a time when Irish citizens are bailing out the losses of private banks, and have faced cuts to social welfare, the State is complicit in measures that shore up the enormous wealth of the corporate sector, and erode social fabric and infrastructure.”

As part of its campaign for financial justice, the European Attac Network is calling for a global taxation for corporations, ‘unitary taxation’. This means that large corporations would be taxed as a single entity on the basis of a joint report of the activities and profits of all subsidiaries worldwide.

Under unitary taxation, profits would be split by a levy allocated to those countries, for example, based on the variable wage payments, fixed assets and sales. This measure would ensure that corporations cannot avoid tax payments through complex transfer pricing and other arrangements.

In addition to calling for unitary taxation, Attac Ireland calls for an immediate investigation into the legality of Irish tax arrangements, and a commitment from the Irish government to close down the socially costly and morally bankrupt ‘double Irish’ loophole.

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The September Socialist Voice Out Now

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The September Socialist Voice is now available online 

List of articles in this issue

Illusions of recovery

In early September the minister for public expenditure, Brendan Howlin, claimed that the Government’s economic strategy was so successful that “we’re not going back to boom and bust.” But he is not the first social democrat, and no doubt will not be the last, to make that grandiose claim.

Slump and boom are inherent in the capitalist system, and recurrent crises cannot be prevented within capitalism but only by defeating capitalism itself.

Capitalism is prone to sequences of slump and boom, coupled with wild financial speculation and property and asset bubbles. It simply cannot exist otherwise.

Guests of the nation

Being a theoretical journal with an unambiguous world view, Socialist Voice places less emphasis on the type of investigative journalism that features prominently in more commercially inclined publications. Nevertheless there is a role for this method of news-gathering and especially when an intriguing rumour is begging for authentication.

Suffer Little Children

The United States is one of three countries that have failed to ratify the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. In this it finds itself in the august company of Somalia and South Sudan. Somalia, however, has committed itself to ratifying, and South Sudan’s parliament has passed a bill to do so.

To be fair, it has to be said that the United States played an active role in the drafting of the bill, and has actually signed, though not ratified, it. Among the reasons given is the fear of a backlash from the religious right, who see the bill as an assault on their rights.

The Republican Congress eighty years on: A relevant or redundant concept?

Like any organisation, the Republican Congress was a product of its time and place; therefore we need to understand it on its own terms and in the historical conditions of the time.

Ireland eighty years later is a different place from the Ireland of the 1920s and 30s. The world is different, and the balance of forces has shifted.

We need to consider such factors as the deep economic crisis of the system at the time, which had a huge impact on Ireland. Unemployment in the South stood at more than a quarter of a million; there was mass emigration, widespread poverty, and evictions from farms and homes.

A stark class divide

A recent report from the Higher Education Authority reveals a stark class divide in Dublin when it comes to access to higher education. The report confirms what all socialists already knew: that teenagers from the leafy middle-class suburbs are far more likely to go on to third-level education than those from less privileged areas of the city.

Lance Armstrong should keep his jerseys

In July, RTE featured a documentary on Paul Kimmage, the sports journalist. He was portrayed as the journalist who exposed Lance Armstrong as a cheat, and was one of the main journalists who campaigned about the use of drugs in professional cycling.

There is no doubt that Kimmage is a unique journalist, and in fact he is one of the small number of people—never mind journalists—who actually completed a Tour de France when he was a professional cyclist. He could have completed a second Tour but withdrew. This still seems to be a source of regret to him.

Political statement

National Executive Committee, Communist Party of Ireland

The National Executive Committee of the Communist Party of Ireland expresses its solidarity with workers now engaged in industrial struggles to defend their livelihood.

Iarnród Éireann workers are struggling to prevent a cut in wages arising out of Government policy, which is to to run down the rail service, and public transport in general, in the interests of privately owned companies, to shift the burden of running public transport onto the workers and travelling public, and to remove the state from any meaningful social responsibility for providing a comprehensive public transport service.

Whoop it up for freedom!

René González, the first of the Cuban Five to be released, was due to speak at meetings in Liverpool and London to mark the sixteenth anniversary of their arrest.

Who really owns us?

It was announced last month that the value of Government bonds at the end of last May was €113.216 billion—120 per cent of the value of the country’s annual economic output. 53 per cent of these bonds are held by foreign individuals and institutions.

Along with Portugal, Ireland is one of the EU’s most indebted countries, and it has recently taken to share-switching to stave off an inability to pay its creditors. Short-term bonds due to be cashed in in 2016 are swapped for ten-year bonds, and so the evil day is postponed.

O’Flaherty Summer School a huge success

Féile na bhFlaitheartach, 2014—the Liam and Tom O’Flaherty Society’s August summer school—was a fantastic weekend, richly rewarding for all who made it to Árainn.

The school opened with a talk by Theo Dorgan on the horrific industrial slaughter that was the First World War, making the point that if it were not for the literary records of the brutality and horrors of this war in books such as Liam O’Flaherty’s Return of the Brute later generations could be more easily duped by politicians and the the media into believing there was something heroic in it.

On Tom Gilmartin

Frank Connolly, Tom Gilmartin: The Man Who Brought Down a Taoiseach and Exposed the Corruption and Greed at the Heart of Irish Politics (Dublin: Gill and Macmillan, 2014); ISBN 978-0-7171-6047-1; €16.99 / £14.99.

Níl siad imithe uainn fós, bíodh a fhios agat—polaiteoirí, baincéirí, lucht forbartha, agus infheisteoirí cama, ná na fórsaí taobh thiar díobh. Ná níl scéal Bhinse Flood/Mahon thart go fóill, mar a mheabhraigh cúis George Redmond sa Chúirt Uachtarach dúinn i mí Iúil.

Bratacha Bána

Gabriel Rosenstock

The pigs are back!

Tomás Mac Síomóin, Is Stacey Pregnant? Notes from the Irish Dystopia (Nuascéalta, 2014; ISBN 978-1-4992-1354-6; $10.75). Available from Amazon, Connolly Books, and general booksellers.

Anybody familiar with Orwell’s Animal Farm will be amused by Tomás Mac Síomóin’s rebirth of the pig as the “Smilin’ Porky” in his newly published novel Is Stacey Pregnant?—although the amusement will not last long as this novel gradually unfolds its horror!

The first expressionist play in Irish

Expressionism is an art form that developed fully in Germany in the years before the First World War (in painting, poetry and drama) and after the war in German cinema. It arose from a sense of existential fear and a world going out of control.

Its themes are very often psychological struggle, insanity, and unfathomable forces controlling people’s lives. Mainstream bourgeois aesthetics of outward objectivity are rejected in favour of the aesthetics of ugliness as the way these artists perceived their reality in the build-up for war and following it, right through the 1920s.

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The Rising Tide – LookLeft 19 in Shops Now

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LookLeft 19 is in Easons stores and hundreds of selected newsagents across the island now. Still only €2 this issue includes former Worker’s Party President Séan Garland’s assessment of the career of Eamon Gilmore, an exclusive article by Greek economist, Yanis Varoufakis, on the failure of European Social Democracy, an interview with new Socialist Party TD Ruth Coppinger, an examination of the growing militancy among trade union members in Ireland and John Cooney on Scottish Independence and much, much more…

Contents include:

CLASS AND THE CATHOLIC CHURCH

The links between Irish corporate and clerical elites, Richard McAlevey investigates.

RACISM, NORTH AND SOUTH

Brian McDermott and Kevin Squires discuss the rise of racism on both sides of the Border.

THE OIREACHTAS’ NEWEST SOCIALIST

Kevin Squires meets Ruth Coppinger to discuss her aims in the Dáil.

CAN RENT CONTROLS WORK?

Osal Kelly discusses how to put a lid on a the bubbling housing market.

WHAT IS TTIP?

Dara McHugh and Padraig Mannion discuss the threat to democracy from the secretive trade deal.

RISING TIDE OF EXPECTATIONS Workers are seeking a new militancy in the trade union movement, Francis Donohoe explores.

THE FORUM Seán Garland bids an unfond farewell to Eamon Gilmore. Also featuring John Cooney, Anna Quigley, Cian O’Callaghan, Marie Moran and Gavin Mendel-Gleason.

WHAT NEXT FOR EUROPE?

Yanis Varoufakis and Terry McDonough discuss the fall of European social democracy and look at how the Left can rise instead.

RADICAL PROTESTANTS

Conall Parr looks at the legacy of radical Protestants in Northern Ireland politics

GLAM ROCK AND ANARCHY

Dara McHugh talks music, politics and petty theft with pioneering Dublin folk band Lynched.

NO NAZIS AT MALMÖ

Neil Dunne discusses the reactions of Malmö FC to the stabbing of a fan by neo-nazis.

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Left Forum: The Marxist Seminars Are Back!

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The Marxist Seminars are back!

After our initial 6 seminars based on theoretical topics, we thought we’d run the next 6 on ‘Marxism in Practice’.

We will be beginning on Saturday 9th August, 6pm, Chaplin’s Bar, Hawkins’ Street, D2. Each seminar will be at the same time and venue fortnightly thereafter.

Miles Link will be introducing the first seminar and will be put the case forward for the Frankfurt School of ideas. Western Marxism: Problems of mass culture. A lively debate will surely follow as always.

The full programme is the following:

  1. Western Marxism: Problems of mass culture – Miles Link
  2. Comparing popular resistance to neoliberalism in Latin America the in 80s and 90s to the situation in Ireland in the current context of crisis – Prof Barry Cannon NUI Maynooth
  3. Marxist Analysis of the Trade Union movement – Andrew Phelan
  4. Fundamentals of communist production and distribution – Gavin Mendel-Gleason
  5. Personality & History – Helena Sheehan
  6. Marxism & Feminism – Sinead Kennedy

Hope to see you all over the coming months!

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March & Rally for Palestine: Slaughter in Gaza – Israel must be sanctioned!

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[Dublin] March & Rally: Slaughter in Gaza – Israel must be sanctioned!

Sat, 2 August 2014, 14:00 Assemble GARDEN OF REMEMBRANCE, Parnell Square, Dublin 1

This Saturday 2nd August in Dublin there will be another march in solidarity with the people of Palestine, especially those trapped in Gaza who are being killed in their hundreds, maimed in their thousands and terrorised in their entirety by the Israeli war machine.

Assemble 2pm at The GARDEN OF REMEMBRANCE, Parnell Square, Dublin 1. March to Department of Foreign Affairs, St. Stephen’s Green.

JOIN THIS EVENT ON FACEBOOK

Please bring friends, flags, banners, noise. We would ask that you do not bring party-political flags (Irish, Palestinian or others). We are also asking people to bring flowers to leave at the Department.

This week we are bringing the march to the Department of Foreign Affairs. Clearly, the Irish government is out of step with the views of the people of Ireland on this issue. For almost a month thousands upon thousands of people have protested all over Ireland, both in solidarity with the people in Gaza and demanding Irish action. Sadly, the government has not listened, and has taken no action to sanction Israel. We must tell them that €500,000 aid is welcome, but it is time to take concrete political action to sanction Israel for its ongoing crimes against the Palestinian people.

This slaughter must end immediately, and Israel must be held accountable for its criminal actions against the Palestinian people. Israeli impunity must end.

The Ireland-Palestine Solidarity Campaign will be asking the Irish government to play their part in imposing sanctions on Israel by calling for an international arms embargo on Israel and calling for Israel to be suspended from the Euro-Med Agreement which grants its trading privileges with the EU, amongst other things.

The Israeli state has launched a fresh assault on the Palestinian people, a collective punishment of a captive population. Israeli officials are now talking about “expanding and intensifying” the assault on Gaza which has already killed some 1200 people, the vast majority of them civilians including over 200 children. Over 7,000 people, mostly civilians, have been wounded, including almost 1,500 children and 1,000 women. 500 houses have been targeted and destroyed and 1000s of others extensively damaged, while at least 215,000 civilians have been forcibly displaced. Attacks have also been taking place in the West Bank for the two months month, where at least 20 people have been killed.

Join us this Saturday to make your voices heard, and tell the government that it’s time to sanction Israel.

Organised by the Ireland-Palestine Solidarity Campaign.

Supporting Organsiations: Irish Congress of Trade Unions, SIPTU, Trade Union Friends of Palestine, Gaza Action Ireland, TEEU (The Power Union), Academics for Palestine, Irish Anti-War Movement, Sadaka – The Ireland Palestine Alliance, Peace and Neutrality Alliance

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THEY KEEP KILLING, WE KEEP MARCHING!

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This Saturday 26th July in Dublin there will be another march in solidarity with the people of Palestine, especially those trapped in Gaza who are being killed in their hundreds, maimed in their thousands and terrorised in their entirety by the Israeli war machine.

Assemble 2pm at The Spire, O’Connell Street, Dublin 1. March to Israeli Embassy.

Please bring friends, flags, banners, noise. We would ask that you do not bring party-political flags (Irish, Palestinian or others).
The Israeli state has launched a fresh assault on the Palestinian people, a collective punishment of a captive population. Israeli officials are now talking about “expanding and intensifying” the assault on Gaza which has already killed some 660 people, the vast majority of them civilians including 161 children and 91 women.

Over 3,500 people, mostly civilians, have been wounded, including almost 1,000 children and 700 women. 500 houses have been targeted and destroyed and 100s of others extensively damaged, while thousands of civilians have been forcibly displaced. Attacks have also been taking place in the West Bank for the past month, where at least 10 people were killed.

This slaughter must end immediately, and Israel must be held accountable for its criminal actions against the Palestinian people.
We must call for an international arms embargo on Israel, and for Israel to be suspended from the Euro-Med Agreement whihc grants its trading privileges with the EU. Israeli impunity must end.
Join us this Saturday to make your voices heard.

Organised by the Ireland-Palestine Solidarity Campaign.

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March & Rally – Stop Israel’s slaughter in Gaza!

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[Dublin] March & Rally – Stop Israel’s slaughter in Gaza!

Sat, 19 July 2014, 14:00 Assemble @ The Spire, O’Connell Street, Dublin 1

This Saturday 19th July in Dublin there will be another march in solidarity with the people of Palestine, especially those trapped in Gaza who are being killed, maimed and terrorised by the Israeli war machine.

Assemble 2pm at The Spire, O’Connell Street, Dublin 1. March to Israeli Embassy, via the Dail.

Please bring friends, flags, banners, noise. We would ask that you do not bring party-political flags.

The Israeli state has launched a fresh assault on the Palestinian people, a collective punishment of a captive population. Israeli officials are now talking about “expanding and intensifying” the assault on Gaza which has already killed some 200 people, the vast majority of them civilians including 36 children and 29 women. Over 1,200 people, mostly civilians, have been wounded, including 368 children and 253 women.  246 houses have been targeted and destroyed and 100s of others extensively damaged, while thousands of civilians have been forcibly displaced. Attacks have also been taking place in the West Bank for the past month, where at least 10 people were killed.

This slaughter must end immediately, and Israel must be held accountable for its criminal actions against the Palestinian people.

Join us this Saturday to make your voices heard.

Organised by the Ireland-Palestine Solidarity Campaign.

Supporting Organsiations: Irish Congress of Trade Unions, Trade Union Friends of Palestine, Gaza Action Ireland, TEEU (The Power Union), Academics for Palestine, Irish Anti-War Movement, Sadaka – The Ireland Palestine Alliance, Peace and Neutrality Alliance

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Emergency Protest & Rally: Stop Israel’s slaughter in Palestine! Sat 12th July 2pm @The Spire O’Connell St

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[Dublin] Emergency Protest & Rally: Stop Israel’s slaughter in Palestine!

Sat 12th July 2014, 2pm @ The Spire, O’Connell Street, Dublin 1

Please bring friends, flags, banners, noise. We would ask that you do not bring party-political flags.

The Israeli state has launched a fresh assault on the Palestinian people, a collective punishment of a captive population. At the time of writing, more than 100 people have been killed in bloody airstrikes in Gaza, including at least 9 children. Israeli occupation forces have launched hundreds of attacks on the people of Gaza, and injured scores. Attacks have also been taking place in the West Bank for the past month, where at least 9 people were killed.

This slaughter must end immediately, and Israel must be held accountable for its criminal actions against the Palestinian people.

Join us this Saturday to make your voices heard.

Organised by the Ireland-Palestine Solidarity Campaign.

Supporting Organsiations: Gaza Action Ireland, Irish Anti-War Movement

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Unite Seminar: Ireland needs a pay rise: Wage floors and economic recovery

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A Unite the Union Seminar
Unite offices (Matt Merrigan Hall), 55/56 Middle Abbey Street, Dublin 1
Thursday 10th July, 9.30am – appr. 1.30pm

How can we ensure that all workers in Ireland earn a Living Wage or above? Research shows that Irish wages in the private sector are well below other European countries, despite the fact that Irish productivity is high and Irish profits are growing. This is not just a feature of the traditional low-paid sectors – retail and hospitality.

Even in the manufacturing and professional services sectors, low pay persists. This seminar will examine how robust wage floors can help produce a wage-led recovery.

Schedule

09.00 Registration, tea/coffee
Chair: Siobhán O’Donoghue, Director, Uplift
09.30 Opening
David Begg, General Secretary, Irish Congress of Trade Unions
09.40 Why the economy needs a pay rise
Prof Terrence McDonough, NUI Galway
10.00 Minimum Essential Standards of Living: Expenditure and a Living Wage
Sr Bernadette McMahon, Vincentian Partnership
10.15 Raising the floor: Driving up the Minimum Wage
Dr Rory O’Farrell, Nevin Economic Research Institute
10.30 Raising the floor: Increasing hours
Brian Forbes, National Co-Ordinator, Mandate trade union
10.45 Is there a case for an enhanced system of JLCs?
Dr Joe Wallace, University of Limerick
11.00 Panel discussion – beneficiaries of improved wage floors (tea/coffee)
Representatives from National Women’s Council of Ireland, Migrant Rights
Centre Ireland, Civil and Public Services Union and We’re Not Leaving.
(5 minute presentations followed by discussion)
12 noon Strategies for raising the floor
Michael Taft, Research Officer, Unite the Union
12.10 Discussion
1.00 Response
John Douglas, President, Irish Congress of Trade Unions
1.15 Closing
Jimmy Kelly, Regional Secretary, Unite the Union
Tea/coffee, sandwiches
For information or to reserve a place contact alex.klemm@unitetheunion.org

Time & Date
Thursday 10th July, 9.30am – appr. 1.30pm

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